Designing a digital product or web property is not a simple task that involves various blocks, colors, and text—it has more to do with the user and the ease of usability of the product, so that the users find the experience interesting, rewarding, and enriching at the same time.

For designers, the most fundamental principle for designing a great product revolves around this idea: a user need not think while using it.

But, how to achieve this end? How can you make sure all the elements of your design are self-explanatory and visible to the user so that the desired action could be taken without much trouble?

Well, there is research and behavior patterns available and certain theoretical rules that you could follow.

For example, the behavior pattern of a YouTube user would be to try finding the full-screen icon on the bottom-right. However, for an Amazon Prime user, this icon appears top-right. The behavior of the users could be conditioned and patterned accordingly. Similar examples and data could be put to use while you design your product.

Another instance of data could be the type of device your audience has—it may sound very strange but there are many countries with a vast population (the population that uses the internet) that is opening up to the experience of using a smartphone for the first time. So, for them, the conditioning can be developed because they are new to the environment—till now, they might have experienced the joy of using internet on desktops or possibly on laptops.

Smartphone designing is completely different from desktop or laptop online properties because space is small, and you have to depend solely on the touch, which could be tricky. Your prompt and visibility should be such that it is easier for the new users too to find the relevant links, icons, and features. If they have to spend time and brain to find your features, you have failed your design!